Blindness Blindness by Jose Saramago
rating: 2 of 5 stars

About a hundred fifty excellent pages into the opus of the Nobel Prize-crafty man of letters, something happens. If it happens in the book, it's not observable - a reader is only able to approximate its location in the story in the wake of the remaining seventy thousand words. And it happens to the whole of the book. Neither an important character nor the text itself, for example, suddenly goes blind; we are operating in the next level of indirection. It's as if a vital gene has been replaced: nothing may be immediately evident, yet the organism is now fundamentally and terminally different. It could only be an achievement or nothing; and who cares that it's the latter.

Not worth reading.

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